Posted by Andrew Abu Realtors on 11/6/2017

The idea of a tight-knit neighborhood seems like an artifact of a simpler time in our country. And, in many ways, it is. Improvements in transportation and technology make it easier than ever to be connected with friends and family across the country and around the world.

However, there are still many good reasons to get to know your neighbors, aside from as a common courtesy. In this article, weíll break down those reasons for you.

A watchful eye

If you plan on going for an extended vacation, itís good to know at least one neighbor who you can trust to watch over your home while youíre away. That can include reporting any suspicious behavior and bringing in your mail so that it isn't obvious that your home is empty.

If you have kids, your neighbors are a good way to find out about any neighborhood news and safety concerns you should be aware of, which brings us to our next reason to get to know your neighbor.

Learning about the neighborhood

When you move into a new community, there often arenít many ways to learn about the local events and places of interest. Introducing yourself to your new neighbors is a good way to learn about the place you moved to. Itís also a way to ask about any concerns you may have, such as traffic, noise level, or road safety if you have children who will be playing outside.

A helping hand

Like we mentioned before, itís good to have trustworthy neighbors while youíre on vacation for home security reasons. However, itís also a good opportunity to have neighborhood kids lend a hand while youíre away. You can pay them to mow your lawn, water the grass or flowers, and feed your pets. This makes your life easier and teaches them a lesson in work and reward.

Lending tools and services

Itís good to know a few neighbors with tools that you donít have so that you can let one another borrow seldom-used tools rather than buying or renting them just for the occasional use.

Similarly, if you have an elderly neighbor, itís a rewarding gesture to help them out when you see they need help with groceries, shoveling, or other physically demanding tasks. Those small gestures can also go a long way when it comes to gaining a friend in the neighborhood who you can count on for the local news.

No ill-will between good neighbors

Letís face it, neighbors can be a source of annoyance at times. If itís late on a school night and your neighbors are being noisy while you and your children are trying to sleep, youíll have a lot better chance of getting them to quiet down if you have an established, friendly relationship.

Similarly, if you have a family cookout and need to park cars in front of their lawn, theyíre more likely to not mind if youíve helped them out in the past.


So, for these five reasons, and for many others, it pays to get to know your neighbors.

 





Posted by Andrew Abu Realtors on 8/24/2015

The time has come to buy a home and you have a list of questions a mile long. How many bedrooms does it have? What is the down payment? What are the taxes? What school district is it in? But there are some questions you should be asking that you may not have considered and these answers will not be disclosed on the property's listing sheet. In order to make a smart buying decision you will want to dig a little deeper into the neighborhood's crime rate, area residents and what safety measures are in place to keep your family safe. Here are a just a few things you will want to research before buying your next home: 1. Check the sex offender registry. Most states have provisions like†Meganís Law and other registries where individuals with histories of criminal convictions must register their home addresses with local authorities. Check the address of the home you are considering to see who is living in your potential new neighborhood. 2. What is the history of the home? You may think this unusual but some abandoned homes have been used as drug labs. Homes that were used as drug labs are hazardous to your health. A home that served as a methamphetamine lab contains chemicals that often make unsafe to live in. These homes are usually but not always sold by banks as foreclosures. If the bank or real estate agent does not know the home's history they donít have a legal obligation to disclose it so you will have to do your own homework. First, talk to neighbors to see if they have any information. You can also search the federal Drug Enforcement Associationís Clandestine Laboratory Registry. 3. †Check the neighborhood's crime rate. Don't look at just the numbers of crime but also consider what sorts of crimes happen in the area. Are the crimes†violent and non-violent? Will you need to invest in a car alarm or a security system after a rash of break-ins? SpotCrime.com gives detailed crime data, breaking down crime types with easy-to-scan icons and providing data for communities all over the country. 4. †What precautions are in place in the neighborhood? Does the neighborhood have a watch program? Talk to the homeís seller and the neighbors about what type of precautions are in place. For more information on neighborhood watch programs check out the National Crime Prevention website. 5.†Visit the neighborhood at different hours of the day; watch for unsavory visitors, traffic and vacant homes. Buying a home is an investment in your family and your future. If you have any other questions regarding local information your real estate professional can help point you in the right direction. You can also always call the local police department and ask for any statistics they have on the area.